Wednesday, April 9, 2014

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival 2014

We went to the 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival this weekend in Gloucester, Virginia. The last time I visited the festival was in 2010 and it certainly has grown a lot since then.


(all photos taken with my cell phone and edited in google+)

Gloucester Daffodil Festival Poster 2014
Winning Daffodil Festival poster by Carol Aldridge
The history of the daffodil in Gloucester County is nearly as old as the county. When Gloucester was formed in 1651 from part of York County, early settlers brought daffodils from England. Settlers soon discovered the soil and weather conditions were good for them. The bulbs were passed from neighbor to neighbor, naturalizing by the beginning of the 20th century. The daffodil industry (which earned the county the title "Daffodil Capital of America") developed during the 1930s and 1940s. [8] 

We got there when it started Saturday morning and found a nice spot to watch the parade, and I must say, it was pretty good, especially thanks to the Tidewater Shrine Club. Wow, do they know how to put on a show. Check out this video of the shriners doing their thing:


If you can't watch the video, a group of Shriners are driving mini racecars down the parade route, all the while doing a fast and tight formation of circles and figure eights. It was pretty exciting to see and a great kick off to the festival.

Here are just a few highlights of the parade:

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Shriners in parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Shriners in parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Shriners in parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Shriners in parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com
You have got to love Shriners on tricycles. 

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com
Beyond Boobs Breast Cancer Organization with the Good Health Fairy®

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com
This pup is for adoption at the Gloucester  Mathews Humane Society.

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Parade at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com


After the parade, we walked down to the main festival area, and it was packed! I couldn't believe how many people were here this year compared to my last visit a few years ago.  Plus,  we really lucked out with beautiful weather. 

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com


28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

I have to give a shout out to this tent for the Bread For Life Food Pantry, where my parents volunteer a LOT of their time every week, and they love it. The Pantry is located at The Church of St. Therese  but it is run with the help of volunteers from 10 local churches. 

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

Virginia is for Lovers Sign at 28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

The Virginia is for Lovers sign was making an appearance in front of the Gloucester Museum of History, and I really wanted my picture with it, but every time we passed by there was a long line.  So, I had to make do with a shot from afar. I did get the Beyond Boobs fairy in the picture, though.

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com
I loved the flower arrangement at this business's entry.

I want one of these!


28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

And of course, the star of the festival, the daffodils. 

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com

28th Annual Gloucester Daffodil Festival via foobella.blogspot.com


If you ever drive through the county of Gloucester, Virginia starting in March every year, you will see daffodils popping up not only in the median of US route 17, but in front of homes, businesses, and hidden in nooks and crannies in the woods. It's such a beautiful welcoming of Spring.

Thank you for visiting. 

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Spring in Colonial Williamsburg Part II

Yesterday I showed you around Colonial Williamsburg (CW) from our visit last May. Today I wanted to show you around some more from the same visit, with maybe a few more recognizable buildings in the mix. Oh, and that Colonial Garden we always make a habit of walking through to see the wares, and flora and fauna they  have for sale.


(all photos taken with a canon powershot 870 IS {except last two taken with my cell phone} and edited in google+)
bird whistles at Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
Inside a shop.

Colonial Williamsburg gardens in spring via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Williamsburg period buildings via foobella.blogspot.com
Just one of many tiny buildings in this little city.

Compton Oak Tree in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
The Compton Oak
I was looking for information for this tree above, because it's massive and a favorite for everyone who visits. Well, I found this interesting google maps site for The Williamsburg Heritage Tree Program. The Compton Oak, which is on East Nicholson Street across from the St. George Tucker house, is a National Champion. If you see it in person, you will know why. It's stunning.


                               
                                             View Williamsburg's Heritage Tree Program in a larger map

The Magazine in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
The Magazine

The Courthouse in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
The Courthouse

Governor's Palace in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
The Governor's Palace
All three buildings above, The Magazine, the Courthouse, and the Governor's Palace, you will need a ticket to enter. I have yet to go in the Courthouse, but we went into the magazine on our visit last May.

English Garden in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

English Garden in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
The garden above is next to the Colonial Garden shop. As I said, many places at CW you will need a ticket to enter, even some of the gardens, but you can see this one on Duke Of Gloucester Street, which is basically the "Main Street" of Colonial Williamsburg. You'll know you need a ticket to enter a garden, building, or shop if there is a British flag (Union Jack) flying at the entrance.

Colonial Williamsburg gardens in spring via foobella.blogspot.com


Colonial Garden in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

Here is the Colonial Garden, where you can take home a piece of Colonial times.  This shop is open to the public.

Colonial Garden in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Garden in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

Johnn Jump-ups in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Garden pottery in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Garden in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

I will leave you with these last photos, which actually were taken on our last visit a few weeks ago. 

daffodils in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

daffodils in Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

The daffodils are always the first to pop up.

Colonial Williamsburg is a must see if you love American History and gardens, and learning about colonial living.  I like to think of CW as being our area's "baby" Central Park. =)

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Spring in Colonial Williamsburg, Part I

Is spring really, finally here to stay? I certainly hope so. I am ready for it. Winter seems to have had a hold on everyone this year, but I think spring is starting to take over. I love seeing the tiny blooms peaking out of my twisted willows and Japanese maples.

I love Colonial Williamsburg in spring. We took a walk there recently and everything is still dormant or unplanted. But, I thought I'd share some pictures from a visit last May that I meant to share at that time, but never got around to. Hopefully this will get you in the springtime mood.

(all photos taken with a canon powershot 870 IS and edited in google+)

red buckeye tree at Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com
Red Buckeye
When we walked over to the "colonial garden" area on Duke of Gloucester Street we looked around to see if we could find the name of this tree above.

Colonial Williamsburg gardens  red buckeye via foobella.blogspot.com
red buckeye

We're pretty sure this is it judging from it's label (above).


Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

I love walking through all the gardens here. You can go from one manicured yard to the next down brick walkways and through little garden gates.

Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

brick walkway, moss, flowers Colonial Williamsburg via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com


Colonial Williamsburg Gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Williamsburg Gardens via foobella.blogspot.com


Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com


Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

If you've never been to, or even heard of, Colonial Williamsburg, it used to be the capital of Virginia during colonial times. Basically, it's a living museum with ..... let me just copy and paste from wiki. So much easier:

Colonial Williamsburg is a living-history museum and private foundation representing the historic district of the city of Williamsburg, Virginia, USA. The 301-acre (122 ha) Historic Area includes buildings dating from 1699 to 1780 (during which the city was the capital of Colonial Virginia), as well as Colonial Revival and more recent reconstructions. The Historic Area is an interpretation of a Colonial American city, with exhibits including dozens of authentic or re-created buildings related to colonial and American Revolutionary War history. -- read more at Colonial Williamsburg's Wikipedia page.
You need a ticket to get into many of the buildings, as it is a museum with costumed interpreters, but you can walk the streets, drink/eat in the taverns, enter many of the shops, and enjoy some of the gardens for free. If you haven't visited, I highly recommend it. It's a beautiful place.

I feel like I've visited it more in the past few years than I have my entire life, even though I've always lived within 30 minutes of it.

Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

Colonial Williamsburg gardens via foobella.blogspot.com

This is just kind of a tiny peek inside this living museum. Tomorrow I will show you some of it's more recognizable buildings and a bit of the colonial garden shop. More flowers!
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...